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Controversy continues over proposed WSU medical school

Controversy continues over proposed WSU medical school

 The University of Washington released a scathing rebuttal this week to a report supporting the creation of a medical school for Washington State University, saying it contains “a number of deep flaws,” and is based on “faulty assumptions, omissions and erroneous data.”

WSU first approached consultant MGT of America in February to conduct a feasibility assessment for a new medical school based on the University's health sciences campus in Spokane. Specifically the assessment was to focus on the need for physicians in Eastern Washington, the best educational model to meet those needs, if current WSU resources were capable of creating a program to meet accreditation standards and the required time and resources to develop a new medical school.

WSU enrollment hits record high

WSU enrollment hits record high

New numbers released by Washington State University today show an all-time high in enrollment this semester, along with an increase in diversity and size.

Some 28,686 students are enrolled at WSU campuses throughout the state this semester, over 1,000 students more than the previous record set in fall 2012 and a four percent increase over last year's enrollment.

“This is good news,” said Dan Bernardo, WSU provost and executive vice president. “Undergraduate enrollment is up three and a half percent, which is particularly impressive given the current demographics of the state.” He explained that the state is currently in a “trough” of high a high school graduation curve, reducing the pool of potential students.

At WSU, the overall increase includes a five percent increase in the number of graduate students and a seven percent increase in students pursuing professional degrees in nursing, pharmacy, medical sciences and veterinary medicine.

Fire safety reminder for dormitory living

Fire safety reminder for dormitory living

Dorms are filling up fast around Washington State as students begin or continue their college education, and the state Fire Marshal wants to make sure everyone has a safe school year.

“Fire safety should be reviewed as students settle into their new places,” said State Fire Marshal Chuck Duffy. “Understanding the safety features of a building and knowing your escape routes can significantly increase your personal safety.”

The United States Fire Administration reports an estimated 3,800 university housing fires occur each year. The leading causes include cooking, intentionally set fires, careless smoking, unattended candles and overloaded electrical wiring. Marshal Duffy suggests the following tips to reduce the risk of fire and increase safety:

Cooking should only be done in a location permitted by the school’s policies. Never leave your cooking unattended. If a fire starts in a microwave, leave the door closed and unplug the unit.

"The Streak" documentary featuring Pullman HS football ready to debut

"The Streak" documentary featuring Pullman HS football ready to debut

A soon-to-be Senior at Pullman High School is preparing to debut his pet project nearly two years in the making.

Bryan Nakata was a sophomore when a series of e-mails was shared with him, containing journal entries written in 1957 by a former student and football players. The entries detail the days leading up to a football game that would ultimately end one of the longest winning streaks for any team in the country – 35 games stretching from 1953 until October 1957.

Bryan says it's an incredible feat that has been lost in history until now. He was immediately sucked in to the story and became more interested the more he dug.

“I began to find lost stories from our school and town that I knew were important to our history,” he said. “My collection began with one yearbook out of the four years that our school library had, and five or six photos from the Whitman County Historical Society.”

Check your child's vaccinations before heading back to school

Check your child's vaccinations before heading back to school

Getting ready for back to school means getting school supplies and backpacks, but it's also the perfect time to make sure children are up-to-date on their shots. Getting all of the recommended shots is one of the most important things parents can do to protect their kids' health.

A new survey from the Washington State Department of Health shows vaccination rates are on the rise (71 percent in 2013 versus 65 percent the year before) but are still below the Healthy People 2020 goal of 80 percent, leaving many kids unprotected.

Below is a summary of shots children need:

WSU student planners feature rival school on cover

WSU student planners feature rival school on cover

Students at Washington State University did a double-take when they received their free student planners from The Bookie this week. The cover features a picture of a cougar, the iconic Bryan clock tower and a building that was a little harder to identify.

Down at the very bottom of the cover, with beautiful brick and elegant cherry trees is Savery Hall, a building located at the heart of the campus of WSU's sworn rival – the University of Washington.

Distraught manager Leslie Martin at WSU's bookstore The Bookie says they are aware of the problem and are working with the vendor to come to a solution. The planners are no longer being handed out, but the ones that have been released are not being collected.

There is no word on whether the school will receive a refund or whether a reprint with a corrected cover is in the works. Meanwhile, a photo of the planner is quickly making the rounds online drawing amusement and criticism.

Idaho awarded grant to help low-income students take exams

Idaho awarded grant to help low-income students take exams

The U.S. Department of Education has awarded Idaho $75,552 as part of its efforts to boos college and career readiness for historically under-served students. The grant will help defray the costs of taking advanced placement tests for low-income students.

“This is an opportunity for students throughout Idaho to excel. This grant, along with Advanced Opportunities programs like Fast Forward, offered through the Idaho Department of Education, give students the opportunity to earn college credits in high school,” said Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna. “It's a chance for students to excel without the worry of a financial burden.”

The grants are used to help pay for low-income students taking approved placement tests administered by the College Board, the International Baccalaureate Organization and Cambridge International Examinations. By subsidizing test fees for low-income students, the program is intended to encourage students to take advanced placement tests and obtain college credit for high school courses, reducing the time and cost required to complete a degree.