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Washington state parks free to visit Monday

Washington state parks free to visit Monday

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission wants the public to know that Monday, August 25 is a state parks “free day,” Visitors will not need a Discover Pass to visit state parks.

The free day is in honor of the birthday of the National Park Service, which was established on August 25, 1916.

State free days are part of the legislation that created the Discover Pass, a $30 annual of $10 one-day permit required on lands managed by Washington State Parks, the Washington departments of Natural Resources and Fish & Wildlife. The Discover Pass legislation provided that state parks could designate up to 12 free days each year when the pass would not be required. The pass is still required to access lands managed by DNR and Fish and Wildlife.

The free days apply only to day use, and not to overnight stays or rental facilities.

The next free days coming up on September 27 for National Public Lands Day and November 11 for Veterans Day.

National Night Out Against Crime

National Night Out Against Crime

It's National Night Out and we've put together a list of celebrations in and around your neighborhood.

National Night Out began in 1984 in an effort to promote involvement in crime prevention activities, police-community partnerships and neighborhood camaraderie to send a message to criminals letting them know neighborhoods are organized and fighting back.

Check out the list below to see what's going on in your neck of the woods:

 

Kootenai County, Idaho – Hayden City Park 8930 N. Government Way

  • 4:00 pm to 7:00 pm
  • Entertainment
  • Free Food and Drinks
  • Giveaways
  • Crime Prevention and Safety Information

 

Moscow, Idaho – Eastside Marketplate 1420 S. Blaine St.

Burn ban on DNR forestland east of Cascades starts July 1

Burn ban on DNR forestland east of Cascades starts July 1

Another warning in the face of the upcoming Fourth of July weekend – the Washington State Department of Natural Resources has placed a burn ban on all DNR-protected land east of the Cascades.

Starting July 1 and running until September 30, the burn ban applies to all forestland under DNR fire protection.

“The seasonally dry weather creates a greater risk for wildfires,” said Commission of Public Lands Peter Goldmark. “A burn ban helps to prevent them and protects forests, habitat and property.”

So far this year DNR has already had 172 wildfire starts, which have burned approximately 779 acres across the state.

The ban applies to all outdoor burning on DNR forestland with two exceptions:

Recreational fires in approved fire pits

Gas or propane stoves and barbecue grills

Fireworks and incendiary devices like exploding targets, sky lanterns or tracer ammunition are also illegal.

Warning for campers at Lake Roosevelt 4th of July weekend

Warning for campers at Lake Roosevelt 4th of July weekend

If you're headed to Lake Roosevelt for the upcoming Fourth of July weekend, the Washington Bureau of Reclamation wants to make sure your campsite stays high and dry.

They're advising people camping along the Lake Roosevelt shoreline to be aware of potential dangers that could exist due to rapidly rising lake levels. The lake is impounded by Grand Coulee Dam on the Columbia River about 90 miles west of Spokane.

“When camping along the shoreline, it is recommended that tents and other belongings be kept well away from the water's edge,” said Public Affairs Officer Lynne Brougher. “Although the lake is a popular vacation spot, it is also a working reservoir that supplies water for hydroelectric facilities at Grand Coulee Dam which can result in rapid fluctuations.”

Brougher says campsites that are too close to the water's edge could potentially become flooded and boats that are not properly anchored or secured could drift out into the lake and become a safety hazard.

Firework sales blast off this weekend

Firework sales blast off this weekend

The Fourth of July is just a week away, and firework sales begin this weekend!

Washington State Fire Marshal Chuck Duffy wants to remind residents to know the local laws before purchasing and discharging fireworks, and to make sure you are only using legal fireworks. This year, 937 licenses were issued for retail firework stands.

A fireworks ban has been in place in the unincorporated areas of Spokane County for 21 years, as well as Spokane, Spokane Valley, Cheney and Liberty Lake.

Fireworks are legal on private property in Airway Heights, Medical Lake and Deer Park.

Bottle rockets, missiles and firecrackers are illegal anywhere in Washington state.

In Coeur d'Alene, non-aerial fireworks are allowed on private property but not in public places like Tubbs Hill or City Park.

If you do find yourself in an area where fireworks are allowed, there are some guidelines you to keep in mind to make sure your family has a safe and fun Fourth.

UI seeks public input on community sculptures

UI seeks public input on community sculptures

The University of Idaho is asking for public input on sculptures that will be installed in the Intermodal transit Center Sculpture Garden. The results of a survey will help narrow the field down to seven or eight, with the final five being selected by UI President Chuck Staben and his wife, Dr. Mary Beth Staben.

Whitman County Parks warns of possible cougar activity

Whitman County Parks warns of possible cougar activity

Whitman County Parks and Recreation is warning the public about possible cougar activity on the Colfax Trail. While there hasn’t been an actual cougar sighting, there is evidence along the trail suggests one might be in the area.


Whitman County Parks Director Tim Myers said that a hiker reported seeing animal remains at the west end of the Colfax Trail a couple of times over the last few days. Myers said that no one has reported a cougar sighting but they want hikers to be careful in the area as precaution.