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Wild Horses Available For Adoption in Boise

We get news releases about cat and dog adoptions at local shelters all the time, but this is the first we've heard about wild horse adoptions. You'll have to drive all the way down to Boise to adopt wild horses from White Pine and Elko Counties.

They've got bay, palomino, sorrel, grulla, roan and black mares and geldings ranging from eight months to one year of age. The adoption event is on February 27th at 1 p.m. at the Boise Wild Horse Corrals off of Pleasant Valley Road. Adoption fees are $75 for the first horse and $25 for the second horse. You can view the horses ahead of time by calling Wild Horse and Burro Specialist, Steve Leonard at (208) 384-3454.

“All horses available for adoption have been de-wormed and have received vaccinations for common equine conditions and diseases,” according to Leonard. “Adopters will receive complete health care records, as well as herd management and other equine information for their newly adopted animals.” /BLM Press Release

Tundra The Snowy Owl

A snowy owl hit by a car near the town of Davenport is being treated at the Washington State University's Veterinary Teaching Hospital. A world-renowned snowy owl expert says the owl, named Tundra, is part of a phenomenon nationwide unlike anything ever recorded.  With hand-fed meals, a bowl of ice and a fan to keep him cool, the Arctic visitor just might call the Palouse his new home.

Washington Fish and Wildlife Officer Curt Wood found Tundra when someone reported the little guy hopping along the road near Davenport.  Wood says he considered killing Tundra when he noticed he had a broken wing, but says the bird's beauty convinced him not to.

"The owl was very beautiful, and it just looked at me with those big yellow eyes, blinking them from time to time," he said. "It seemed to be totally at ease with me, as if it knew that I was going to save it, so I didn't have the heart to put it down."

Students at WSU Help Pet Owners Grieve Through Hotline

Students at WSU Help Pet Owners Grieve Through Hotline

It's a global hotline that brings comfort to those who lose ones they love. Their pets.

When that number is dialed, it brings you to students at Washington State University's veterinary school. Students are trained in bereavement by WSU's licensed counselor, Kathy Ruby.

"We’ve been contacted by people whose companion pets have died in Japan, New Zealand, Spain. . .” said Ruby, pointing to a world map cluttered with push pins that identify distant places where calls and emails originated.

The hotline started in 1999 to fill a void for grieving pet owners.

Ruby added: "What some people don’t realize is that the pain can be so raw, so real.”

Tortoise Wheeling About After Successful Amputation

A 12-year old African spur-thighed tortoise got some new wheels recently. It's left front leg had to be amputated by Washington State University's College of Veterinary Medicine and it was replaced with a swiveling wheel attached to its shell. Gamara was relinquished by its owner on April 20th due to a severe thermal injury and tissue damage from an unknown source.

Leave the Fawns Alone!

Leave the Fawns Alone!

This little girl was brought into SpokAnimal today by some well-meaning folks. SpokAnimal says she was very young and couldn't even support her weight on her legs. Even though she was by herself, it doesn't mean she was alone. Her mother was probably feeding nearby. SpokAnimal will be taking her to Ponti's in Otis Orchards where she will be taken care of.

WSU Veterinary Hospital Reopens

WSU Veterinary Hospital Reopens

The outbreak of equine herpes virus has ended, and the Washington State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital is again accepting horses. The university says the hospital underwent a major cleaning and sanitation process. Horses will also be examined before they are admitted as an extra precaution. The university said Yesterday that since there have been no new cases they are able to reopen ahead of schedule. There have been no new cases of the virus in Washington in two weeks.

Another Equine Herpes Case Confirmed By WSU

Another Equine Herpes Case Confirmed By WSU

Another case of equine herpes has been confirmed at Washington State University's College of Veterinary Medicine, but this horse wasn't even considered to have the virus at all.

The horse belonged to the university and was put down because it was lame.

The school ran a test for equine herpes and the test came back positive. Now all the school's horses are being monitored for signs of the virus.