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Spokane lawmakers introduce WSU med-school bill with broad bipartisan support

Spokane lawmakers introduce WSU med-school bill with broad bipartisan support

Spokane lawmakers Michael Baumgartner and Marcus Riccelli introduced bills in Olympia on Wednesday that pave the way for a new Washington State University medical school in Spokane, with broad bipartisan co-sponsorship demonstrating deep support in the House and Senate.

Senate Bill 5487, sponsored by Sen. Baumgartner, R-Spokane, has a total 17 signatures. The measure sponsored by Rep. Riccelli, D-Spokane, House Bill 1559, has a total 60 signatures. According to the Washington State Legislature, the strong support in both chambers augurs well for a proposal that aims to boost medical education statewide and relieve a severe shortage of doctors across the state of Washington.

“I am thrilled to be able to submit this bill,” Riccelli said. “Sixty members of the House of Representatives from both sides of the aisle, from all over the state, are joining together to support a stronger, more vibrant medical school system in Washington.”

Community gathers to remember Moscow shooting victim

Hundreds of people gathered at Church of the Nazarene in Moscow on Saturday to celebrate a man that has done so much for his small, but close community.

Co-workers, friends, and family all spoke about what an impact David Trail had on their lives.

His brother told stories from their childhood, stories that will continue to be passed down from generation to generation.

His son spoke to the kind of person his dad was: proud, honest and nurturing.

A smart businessman, just celebrating 50 years with his company. He loved collecting, "Save till it hurts," he would say. He was a talented musician and gardener.

His son also added his dad's sudden loss is shocking, but so is the vast, and very much appreciated, support from the community.

I spoke with a man who was only an acquaintance, but says, Trail touched the lives of many. He was a staple in Moscow, leaving a legacy that will last for years to come.

2015 Specialty Crop Grant applications being accepted in Idaho

2015 Specialty Crop Grant applications being accepted in Idaho

Applications are currently being accepted by the Idaho State Department of Agriculture (ISDA) for the Specialty Crop Block Grant Program.  Funds are provided by the United States Department of Agriculture and are allocated to the state to be awarded through a competitive grant process.  

 

Projects must solely enhance the competitiveness of U.S.-grown specialty crops in either domestic or foreign markets and must provide a benefit to more than just the applicant.  Specialty crops include fruits and vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, and horticulture and nursery crops, including floriculture. 

 

Governor calls for statewide moment of silence for Moscow shooting victims

Governor calls for statewide moment of silence for Moscow shooting victims

Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter is asking Idahoans to take a few minutes on Wednesday, January 13th, at 12:00 p.m. PST, to remember the victims, their families and friends, and the community of Moscow after a series of shootings last Saturday by a lone gunman.

“It is important that everyone in Idaho take time in the wake of this horrendous act to remember those who have lost their lives and offer our support to the families, friends, and Moscow community as they mourn this tragedy,” Governor Otter said. “I ask that all Idahoans observe a moment of silence... to let our friends and families in Moscow know they are in our thoughts and prayers, and that they are not alone in their grief.”

Moscow residents shaken from deadly shooting

As word got around about Saturday's shooting, the small town of Moscow, Idaho came together, still in disbelief about what happened and about the victims left behind.

Police say they don't know why the suspect, John Lee, went on the shooting spree, but Moscow residents say they will forever feel the damage Lee allegedly caused.

News travels fast in a small town. But when that news is that three people have been murdered in cold blood, it leaves an entire community devastated.

The weather matched the mood in Moscow on Monday: foggy and depressing. Northwestern Mutual is closed until Wednesday, while flowers and candles adorned the Arby's.

The streets were quiet and empty, many choosing to stay home with their families, still in disbelief that these brutal murders took place in their cozy Idaho community. Some were even surprised by the unusual timing.

Moscow shooting suspect makes first court appearance

The man suspected of shooting and killing three people and injuring another in Moscow, Idaho on Saturday made his first appearance in a Whitman County courtroom on Monday afternoon.

John Lee, 29, is suspected of killing Moscow businessman David Trail, Arby's restaurant manager Belinda Niebuhr, and the suspect's adoptive mother and Moscow Family Medicine physician's assistant Terri Grzbielski. Seattle resident Michael Chin was also hurt in the serious of shootings.

Lee is charged in Whitman County with felony eluding and Whitman County's prosecutor said it was a miracle that nobody else was hurt when Lee was crossing on oncoming traffic as he sped through Colfax and up US195.

John Lee was led into Whitman County Court wearing what's called a ?suicide smock.? Unlike jail jumpsuits, this vest is easily torn and could not support his weight if Lee tried to use it to hang himself.

Moscow police say the Latah County Jail is gearing up for similar anti-suicidal precautions.

Vigil held for Moscow shooting spree victims

The community of Moscow is coming together to support the loved ones of those killed in Saturday's tragedy.

The city is mourning the loss of Moscow businessman David Trail, Arby's restaurant manager Belinda Niebuhr, and the suspect's adoptive mother and Moscow Family Medicine physician's assistant Terri Grzebielski.

A candle light vigil was held to honor their lives on Sunday night.

?This community loves each other, and when something like this happens in our community, we band together,? said Moscow Mayor Bill Lambert.

Lambert spoke to a crowd of more than 100 at the First United Methodist Church on Sunday. Comforting those in pain, all the while fighting back his own emotion. The mayor was a good friend of David Trail's.

?A gentleman a true gentleman... it's hard to fathom,? Lambert said about Trail.

?I just can't believe it,? said Jason Wilson, a family friend of Grzebielski. ?I can't believe that anything like this would happen.?

As a community mourns together, individuals that knew the victims intimately struggle to find answers.