Our network

Health

Washington sees spike in pesticide related illnesses

Washington sees spike in pesticide related illnesses

From the Washington State Department of Health:


There have been 15 potential pesticide drift events resulting in about 60 people getting ill reported to the Washington State Department of Health in the past two months– that’s as many the agency normally sees in a year.

Thousands enrolled for insurance through Washington, Idaho health exchanges

Thousands enrolled for insurance through Washington, Idaho health exchanges

President Obama announced Thursday eight million people have signed up for health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, while enrollment numbers in Washington and Idaho have been relatively high so far,

According to Washington's insurance commissioner, 146,000 people signed up for private insurance in the first six months. In Idaho, 44,000 people signed up, making the Gem State second in the nation per capita. So why has it been so successful in our two states? Washington and Idaho created their own state-run exchanges, while many states didn't and rely on the federal government.

Washington and Idaho have their own online marketplaces for families to shop for insurance and, despite some challenges like website issues, they've proven to be effective in enrolling people for health care.

Deanna Davis with Better Health Together said sign-up numbers in eastern Washington were higher than expected.

"We did triple enrollments than what we projected to do in our 14 country region," Davis said.

Report shows high rate of tobacco sales to WA minors

Report shows high rate of tobacco sales to WA minors

The number of retailers in Washington that illegally sell tobacco to minors is high for the second year in a row. An annual report that tracks illegal sales shows about 15% of tobacco retailers sold tobacco to minors in 2013, which is about the same as it was in 2012. As recently as 2009, the rate was much lower, at about 9%.

WSU researcher finds peaches slow breast cancer growth

WSU researcher finds peaches slow breast cancer growth

From WSU News:


Washington State University food scientist and colleagues at Texas A&M have found that compounds in peaches can inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells and their ability to spread.

 

WSU Veterinary College warns animal owners of tick paralysis

WSU Veterinary College warns animal owners of tick paralysis

From WSU News:

 

Warming weather in the Pacific Northwest always brings with it a renewed threat of tick paralysis in animals and people.

 

Inslee poised to sign legislation restricting teens from tanning salons

Inslee poised to sign legislation restricting teens from tanning salons

Governor Jay Inslee is expected to sign a bill that will make Washington State the sixth in the country that would prevent minors from using tanning beds, which has owners of local tanning salons, who rely on teen business, concerned.

Cindy Herring owns Jamaica Me Tan in Spokane Valley. Many of her clients are high school students and this legislation would stop most of them from tanning altogether.

"It's going to be difficult," she said.

Herring said she understands the health concerns but says educating young people is better than an all-out ban and that a better solution would be to regulate tanning for minors.

"Many other states have addressed, okay we need to have the signatures of children who are under 18 tanning and I agree with that, that's not going to hurt our business. It's going to let mom know that we're safe, it's going to let mom know the rules, the teenager know the rules, and that's the best thing you can do. Through education it's about safe tanning not risky tanning," she explained.

FDA considering revamping food labels

FDA considering revamping food labels

For the first time in 20 years, nutrition labels on the food you buy could get a big makeover.

Many people have walked through the grocery store, picked up something, tried to read the label and been totally confused. The print is very small, the information not cut and dry. Now the FDA wants to make shopping easier by changing these labels.

"They can be misleading," dietitian Natalie Tauzin said.

But for the first time in two decades, a major makeover, with new labels make calorie count bigger and highlight added sugars.

"So it would spell out how much sugar was added to this versus what was naturally in the milk," Tauzin said.

Tauzin, who works for the Spokane Health District, pointed out the new labels to help consumers decide what to grab from the shelves during a visit to Bargain Giant Foods.

"So it's 38 grams of sugar in this but there is nothing that would be a naturally sugar in this that is inherently in water so it's all added sugar," Tauzin said.

Aside from the larger calorie count print and added sugars column, the new labels will try to reflect what we actually eat, not what's ideal or recommended.