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Pullman Regional Hospital lecture series to feature cardiologist speaking on Women and Heart Disease

Pullman Regional Hospital lecture series to feature cardiologist speaking on Women and Heart Disease

As part of February Heart Health Awareness Month, Pullman Regional Hospital will present "Women and Heart Disease" on Friday, February 27th from 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. The presentation will be held in Conference Room C&D of the hospital.

Brian Fuhs, M.D., cardiologist, cardiologist with Providence Spokane Heart Institute and provider at Pullman Regional Hospital's Specialty Clinic, will talk about heart disease prevention and lipid management for women.

The lecture is free and open to the public. It is part of Pullman Regional Hospital's "Time with the physicians" lecture series.

Hologic 3D Mammography coming to Whitman Hospital & Medical Center

Hologic 3D Mammography coming to Whitman Hospital & Medical Center

Whitman Hospital in Colfax, WA announced Wednesday they will off Hologic 3D Mammography for breast cancer screening as soon as April 2015. 3D mammography produces a three-dimensional view of the breast tissue that helps radiologist identify and characterize individual breast structures without the confusion of overlapping tissue.

In a June 2014 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), a groundbreaking study was published that found Hologic's 3D mammography (breast Tomosynthesis) screening technology significantly increased breast cancer detection while simultaneously reducing the number of false positives. 

The study, "Breast Cancer Screening Using Tomosynthesis in Combination with Digital Mammography", reviewed close to half a million mammography exams. The researchers found that 3D mammography finds significantly more invasive or lethal cancers than the traditional mammogram. According to the study's results, 3D mammography also reduces the number of women called back for unnecessary screenings due to false alarms. For patients, this reduces anxiety as well as health care costs.

Significant findings include:

Pullman Regional Hospital presents Mindful Meditation and Relaxation for the Heart

Pullman Regional Hospital presents Mindful Meditation and Relaxation for the Heart

February is Heart Health month, and to raise awareness Pullman Regional Hospital will present Mindful Meditation and Relaxation for the Heart. The lecture is free and open to the public, and will take place on Friday, February 20 from 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. in Conference Rooms C and D of the hospital.

The lecture will be taught by Jill Herbold, a licensed massage practitioner. Herbold is trained in Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction. She will walk the audience through how to use innate abilities and resources to respond more effectively to stress, pain, and illness. Mindfulness involves purposeful action, focused attention, grounding in the current experience and sense of curiosity.

Local game developers launch crowdfunding campaign for Ebola Attack, an independent game for good

Local game developers launch crowdfunding campaign for Ebola Attack, an independent game for good

Two local developers have launched a crowdfunding campaign to prove games aren't just fun, they also have the power to make a difference in the world.

 

In their game, Ebola Attack, players act as the hero white blood cell that must protect the red cells from a deadly infection: the Ebola virus. Over the course of the game, the human body is healed as gamers progress through increasing levels of difficulty. The player’s goal is to save as many people as possible, meanwhile, all net profits from the purchase of the app will aid the relief effort in the very real Ebola war zone in West Africa.

 

 

UI researchers form Ebola working group

UI researchers form Ebola working group

In response to the ongoing Ebola outbreak in western Africa, researchers at the University of Idaho have formed the Ebola Working Group to create tools to help track and treat the disease – and potentially other viruses.

The group, a subset of the university’s newly formed Collaboratorium for Modeling Complex Problems, is tackling two projects designed to better understand Ebola and how it spreads.

The first uses computer models to determine the implications of ongoing and possible future evolution in Ebola. In December, the National Science Foundation awarded associate physics professor Marty Ytreberg and his team of biology and physics faculty and students a $72,000, one-year grant for the project through its Rapid Response Research program.

INBC reaches safe levels of O-negative and O-positive blood

INBC reaches safe levels of O-negative and O-positive blood

The Inland Northwest Blood Center announced good news on Thursday regarding the levels of O-negative and O-positive blood. The only supplier of blood for area hospitals reported that the supply of these types of blood has reached safe levels.  INBC said that thanks to the donors who have rolled up their sleeve to give blood, they have seen nearly 500 type O donors since Monday. This is a huge response that has brought the blood supply up a remarkable 90% in the last few days.

INBC reminded donors the need for blood does not go on vacation. They urge donors who have made an appointment to keep them in order to ensure blood supply remains at needed levels. INBC needs 200 donors every day, with nearly 90 of those being type O.

INBC at emergency levels of Type O negative and Type O positive blood

INBC at emergency levels of Type O negative and Type O positive blood

The Inland Northwest Blood Center (INBC) is calling all eligible O-Negative and O-Positive blood donors to roll up their sleeve and give blood as soon as possible.

INBC says blood supply has reached critical levels for O blood types, with only 10% of needed blood supply on the shelf. In order to reach a safe blood supply, over 500 blood donors are urgently needed this week.

O-Negative blood is the universal blood type and can be given to anyone in an emergency situations where there is not enough time to match a patient’s blood type. O-Positive is the most common blood type and so is crucial to have a safe supply on hospital shelves. INBC is the only supplier of blood to area hospitals and needs an average of 200 blood donors every day.

In response to the critical levels, INBC is opening its Spokane Center on Thursday, January 1st from 7:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Appointments are encouraged, but walk-ins are needed at this time. Donation centers can be found in Spokane, Coeur d’Alene, Lewiston and the Valley Hospital. For more information, visit www.inbcsaves.org.