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Pullman and Moscow thrift shops asking for donations

Pullman and Moscow thrift shops asking for donations

As important as it is to buy local and support your community, it's also important to donate local – and that's exactly what MyRadio 102.5FM is asking you to do.

MyRadio is teaming up with Habitat for Humanity Resale store in Moscow and Palouse Treasures Thrift Store in Pullman to encourage the community to donate their gently used clothes and other items to local organizations.

Both stores resell donated items to benefit their parent organizations: Palouse Habitat for Humanity and Boose Collaborative.

Items that name make the most impact include clothing, furniture, house wares, toys, electronics, home improvement materials, electrical supplies, appliances, housewares, antiques and home décor.

The need for donations is high in summer as thrift stores prepare for the return of students at the University of Idaho and Washington State University.

There's no donation too small to help a local organization and help the community.

Washington unemployment drops to lowest in six years

Washington unemployment drops to lowest in six years

Thanks to a boost in June, Washington's unemployment numbers have dropped to their lowest levels in six years to 5.8 percent – that's according to the state's Employment Security Department.

Industry sectors saw the largest growth with 2,600 jobs. Retail grew by 2,200, leisure and hospitality by 1,900 and wholesale trade by 1,400. Professional and business services, information, manufacturing, financial services and mining also saw growth in the hundreds.

“After a hiring lull in May, Washington employers really picked up the pace in June,” said Paul Turek, an economist with the department. “The state's economy is picking up momentum and the near term job outlook is good.”

During the one-year period ending in June, Employment Security estimates that employers created 84,700 jobs.

Washington State survey shows job vacancies, hiring on the rise

Washington State survey shows job vacancies, hiring on the rise

A state-sponsored survey of Washington employers shows both hiring and job vacancies increased between fall of 2012 and fall of 2013 and employers say it's taking a lot longer to fill the openings.

The Employment Security Department’s “2013 Fall Job-Vacancy and Hiring Survey Report” estimated job vacancies increased by 23 percent to 86,600 in fall 2013. Estimated hiring rose nearly 10 percent to 209,100.

Employers also reported that vacant positions remained open for more than two months before being filled. That's a striking contrast to the rate of just 19 days in 2012.

The report also shows more than half of the state's job vacancies were in urban areas of Western Washington, accounting for nearly 82 percent of all new hires from July to September last year.

The industry sector with the most job openings was agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and the average estimated hourly wage for $13.69.

Will recreational marijuana supply meet public's demand?

Will recreational marijuana supply meet public's demand?

Recreational marijuana is being grown right now and will hit retail store across Washington in early July but will there be enough to go around?

"This strain is called Train Wreck, it's being harvested today," said Scott O'Neil with Pacific Northwest Medical, as he trimmed a 12" long 1/4 lb. marijuana bud.

Right now O'Neil works in the medical marijuana field but in two weeks he'll be on his own.

"And we'll be selling recreational marijuana," O'Neil added.

He hopes his new store will be the first recreational marijuana store to open in Washington; O'Neil Industries, an authorized retailer of Kouchlock.

"We've secured product from a couple of vendors, definitely working on getting more. The product we have right now is probably going to last a couple days," said O'Neil.

O'Neil said some producers are already sold out for the next year and that's weeks before retail stores even open.

That supply will depend on how many growers can get up to speed in the next couple of months. In hopes of building clientele early O'Neil says he's going for as much variety as he can get his hands on.

From Seattle to Clayton, marijuana stores getting ready to open

From Seattle to Clayton, marijuana stores getting ready to open

Each day Washington grows closer to legal marijuana sales and some business owners are now setting up shop as the liquor control board pushes forward with its investigations.

The success of potential pot store Savage THC in Clayton could all depend on traffic. Not trafficking but traffic on Highway 395, which connects Spokane to Canada.

"I'm trying to suck in the Canadian visitors by telling them it's only 138 clicks (kilometers)," owner Scott Dekay said.

Dekay is currently building the infrastructure for his pot business.

"I'm thinking like a bank style window, maybe with bars or plexiglass, I'm not sure what I'm going to do yet," he said.

Dekay is excited since receiving this letter from the liquor control board stating his application is moving forward.

"My daughter is here for a visit, I don't see her very often, and I just told her, 'This is the best day of my life since you were born,'" he said.

If he passes a background check and financial investigation he could be awarded a license, but there's still a lot of work to do. Counters, signs, security cameras, everything built to the specifications he presented in his application.

Washingtonians flocking to Idaho for cheaper alcohol

Washingtonians flocking to Idaho for cheaper alcohol

Just hundreds of yards from Washington, and barely into Idaho, the shelves of the State Line Liquor Store are stocked, but sticker shock proves they won't be for long.

The store opened months after Washington voters passed I-1183. When privatized liquor started almost two years ago in Washington, Kootenai County saw an increase of $7 million in liquor sales each year. So many people are crossing the border to buy booze. Those purchases from Washingtonians left nearly $420,000 in sales tax for Kootenai County last year.

If you put the average price for a bottle of liquor at about $20, that means 350,000 bottles would leave the county each year. The sales tax would stay.

The Idaho State Liquor Division says Kootenai County had the highest growth in the state.

"It's not a regular thing but when I'm over here, pop in, just do it," said Eric Carlson of Spokane Valley.

Almost every license plate KXLY saw at the liquor store this afternoon was from Washington, including Eric Carlson's.

"How come they can do it cheaper here, not there. It's not like we're crossing oceans?" Carlson said.

New hotel opens in Pullman

Visitors to Pullman have a new hotel option.

The Residence Inn by Marriott has opened on the Washington State University campus.

The four-story inn brings an additional 131 rooms to a market where getting a hotel room can be difficult.

The Moscow-Pullman Daily News reports the new inn is completely booked for graduation this weekend, while future Homecoming, Apple Cup and Dad's weekends are nearly full.

The hotel is located near the Palouse Ridge Golf Club.